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Bot flies
Bot flies (Oestridae), also botflies, are a family of flies in the order Diptera. There are approximately 100 species found worldwide, 11 of which are encountered in Central Europe. The family of Bot flies is divided into three subfamilies: Oestrinae, Cephenemyiinae and Hypodermatinae. Some examples of species of Bot flies are: sheep bot fly (Oestrus ovis), Gasterophilus intestinalis, Hypoderma diana, Rhinoestrus purpureus, Hypoderma Acteon, Crivellia Silenus, the warble fly (Hypoderma bovis), Hypoderma lineatum and Pharyngomyia picta.

Bot flies reach body lengths of 10-13 mm. They are covered in thick furry hair. The mouth parts of this fly are often highly degenerated, thus many species do not eat solid food. Some species, however, take in fluid. The well developed, large wings have a central vein spreading out in different angle. The thorax is covered with scales and has a number of bristles at the rear end. Mating takes place at elevated places like trees, hills and ridges.

Egg laying takes place on host animals, most commonly on hoofed mammals. The larvae always live parasitically in the interior of the host animals (endoparasites). Many species choose specific animals as the host - which body orifice of the host animal is chosen for egg laying also depends on the species. The hatching maggots (larvae) develop accordingly in the nasal mucous membrane, the throat or beneath the skin (subcutis) of their host animals. Egg laying can be a risky business for some females as the larvae hatch very fast and can attack their own mothers.

The approach of Bot flies can cause panic reactions in in cattle which often sustain severe injuries by running away into fences or barbed wire. The migration and development of larvae inside the host animals inevitably leads to illness and sometimes to the host animals’ death. The larvaes’ stay in the host animals can last as long as several months. In their last larval stage the maggots leave the host animal and fall down to the soil to pupate.



Genera47
Species407
Common namesBot flies, Warble flies, Heel flies, Gadflies, Botflies, Warble fly, Botfly, Bot-fly, Bott fly, Bot fly, Heel fly, Gadfly, Warbles
German namesDasselfliegen, Rachenbremsen, Biesfliegen
Dutch namesEchte horzels, Horzels
Danish namesBremser
Finnish namesKiiliäiset, Saivartajat
Norwegian namesBremser
Swedish namesStyngflugor
AuthorLeach, 1815
Distribution
Checklists

Continents:

Eurasia
America
Africa
Oceania


Ecozones:

Palaearctic
Nearctic
Afrotropical
Neotropical


Fossils:

Cenozoic


Countries
Checklists
Albania, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belize, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Italy, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Mozambique, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Taiwan, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago, USA, Uganda, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Links and ReferencesOestridae in bie.ala.org.au
Oestridae in faunaeur.org
Oestridae in itis.gov
Oestridae in dyntaxa.se
Oestridae in Wikipedia (English)

Further chapters of "Botflies"
- Sheep Nasal Botfly
Quick search: Flies - Fly - Oestridae - Animals - Europe - Sheep
Species - Insects - Mouth - Skin - Animal - Nasal - World - Development
Taxonomy
ClassInsecta
Insects, True insects
SubclassPterygota
Winged insects
InfraclassNeoptera
Wing-folding insects
SuperorderHolometabola
Holometabolous Insects
OrderDiptera
True flies, Mosquitoes, Gnats, Flies
SuborderBrachycera
Short-horned flies, Muscoid flies, Circular-seamed flies, Flies
InfraorderMuscomorpha
SectionSchizophora
SubsectionCalyptratae
Calyptrate muscoids
SuperfamilyOestroidea
FamilyOestridae
Bot flies, Warble flies, Heel flies, Gadflies, Botflies, Warble fly, Botfly, Bot-fly, Bott fly, Bot fly, Heel fly, Gadfly, Warbles
AuthorLeach, 1815
 Species overview
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Keywords
ABCDEFGHIJKLM
NOPQRSTUVWXYZ
German Flag Dasselfliegen
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Frequent Queries:
warble fly pictures (3)
Oestridae pictures (2)
pictures of cattle infected with bot flies (2)
bot flies of europe (2)
hypoderma actaeon (2)
PICTURES OF BOT FLIES IN ANIMALS (1)
photos of insects beneath the skin (1)
Endoparasites in animal pictures (1)
Hypoderma diana in sheep (1)
oestridae gasterophilus (1)